Research shows Brits set to go all out on Christmas decs to beat lockdown gloom

PRESS RELEASE

Photo of Debbie Shields
Debbie Shields | Communications Manager
Consumer News
  • 68% of Brits said they will make their decorations more elaborate this Christmas, spending more on outdoor lighting, roof inflatables and nativity scenes

  • Almost half (48%) confessed their decorations will go up before the end of November

  • Almost half (47%) of those aged 55 and over admitted that due to no family visits, decorations are more important than ever in getting in the festive spirit

  • As the festive frenzy kicks off, leading body NICEIC advises ‘deck the halls without the folly and go pro when it comes to electrical safety’

Determined to add cheer to the lockdown gloom and doom, Britons are going all out on their Christmas decorations this year, a new study has revealed.  

According to research by NICEIC, the UK’s leading name for registered electrical contractors, almost seven in ten (68%) Brits have said they will make their Christmas lights extra special this year.
 
This will involve making their winter wonderland illuminations more elaborate than ever before with new decorations. Over half (51%) will be investing in fixed outdoor lighting and light-up wreaths, whilst nearly four in 10 (38%) will be buying outdoor Christmas figures and adding a nativity scene.

What’s more, a third of Britons will include outdoor inflatables in their Christmas display, as almost a quarter (24%) of shoppers admit they’ll be spending up to £200 on new decorations this season.

Confined to their homes over lockdown, much of the nation is planning on putting its Christmas decorations and lights up much earlier than previous years. Almost half (48%) of people stated their decorations will go up before the end of November. Astonishingly, some Christmas-mad Brits – around 15% - confessed to already having them up by the first week of November.

In response, and just in time for the Christmas peak, NICEIC has launched ‘Deck The Halls Without The Folly', a national campaign warning the public, particularly DIY-dabblers, about the importance of using a qualified electrician.

Paul Collins, NICEIC’s Technical Services Manager, comments: “After the year we’ve had, it’s unsurprising that Brits, currently confined to their homes for a second time, are going all out on their Christmas decorations to add a bit of festive cheer during this gloomy time.

“However, much of the equipment used to deck the halls requires an electrical supply to power it so it’s important that people are aware of the potential electrical safety dangers. For example, it’s important to use the correct type of socket-outlet for Christmas lights – one that is protected by a residual current device (RCD), especially for outdoors.

“As we look forward to the countdown to Christmas, a prime time for electrical catastrophes, our message is simple – deck the halls without the folly and call in a professional, such as those electrical contractors listed with NICEIC, for any electrical work in order to keep your home and family safe.”

Today’s findings come as seasonal favourites cancelled due to the pandemic, such as Christmas markets and switching on the festive lights, have left traditional yuletide revellers relying on home lighting and decorations to get in the festive spirit.

For instance, with Santa’s Grotto a no-go, a third (31%) of parents said putting up Christmas decorations and turning the lights on will be an extra sentimental family affair this year.

Meanwhile, almost four out of 10 people (39%) said that in the absence of family get-togethers, often used to showcase their Christmas trees, external lighting and decorations will be key to connecting with loved ones in the coming weeks.

Warning the British public to be extra vigilant on electric safety this festive season, Paul adds: “While transforming your interior and exterior home into a winter wonderland of illumination sounds like great fun for all the family, it’s important that we remind people to keep safety front of mind, or risk putting homes in jeopardy.”
The survey of 2,000 consumers reveals the nation’s obsession with turning their homes into a magical festive wonderland this Christmas, with some surprising disparities:
  • Over a quarter (26%) of households planning to make their Christmas decorations more elaborate this year are located in London, compared to just 5% in Northern Ireland
  • People living in the South West and Wales most likely to co-ordinate their Christmas lighting with the local neighbourhood and community
  • Due to less socialising, 34% of households said they have more money to spend on decorations and lighting this year
  • 35% of men confessed to following interior trends more closely this year and were looking forward to updating their Christmas d├ęcor, compared to 19% of women
  • 44% of men would like to put roof inflatables and outdoor Christmas figures up compared to just 27% of women
 
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